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20121120
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doors is a different story. john boehner doesn't have the leverage he used to have. on a conference call he told house republicans they had to avoid the nasty showdowns that mark so much of the last two years. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax inkrecreas. spooker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. >> remember in 2011 republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal? now today mitch mcconnell is willing to do a 1 to 1 deal. republicans lost all of their lever
republican secretary -- republican speaker of the house john boehner. i felt like that all isolated john mccain a lot. but you know, maybe he stands alone in terms of his influence on foreign policy matters. >> i think he does. but there's distance emerging between him and where everyone else is. and partly, we should remember this was very -- this was wielded as a cover in the run-up to the election partly because there was this hope, and you would see it all over conservative blogs, and twitter streams, that this was the thing that was going to turn around the election and the mainstream media, because they wanted to get barack obama elected were ignoring the facts of the matter. after the election, because i think people used it in incredibly cynical fashion, there's a little less energy behind the kind of conspiracy mongering except for john mccain who is just in it until the end. >> but then today, the reason this was an important question today, today the talking points that were given to u.n. ambassador susan rice after the benghazi attack, those talking points were published. >> yes
was that john boehner was re-elected as speaker by this republican conference, and they knew that boehner was going to be a dealmaker with the president. so even the hard liners may have read the election returns, and i think even the hard liners don't be responsible for a tax increase. >> not only boehner, even mcconnell. let me show you this, michelle. mcconnell and boehner had a different kind of sound, different tone today after the meeting. watch this. >> obviously the president won re-election. the republicans were basically unable to get any seats in the senate. more people voted for democrats in the house than republicans. why do you have any leverage whatsoever? >> there's a republican majority here in the house. the american people re-elected the republican majority. >> it's important to remember that in this case, the voters also re-elected a republican-controlled house last week. the fact is the government is organized no differently today than it was after the republican wave of 2010. >> now, listen to what they had to say today. >> tomorrow is speaker boehner's birthday. so
to raising taxes on the rich? >> there's no question about it. john boehner was sounding, you know, like there might be some way to compromise on that issue. and i love bill crystal, what he had to say about it. who is somewhat of a leader of the more conservative branch of the republican party. so i'm optimistic. but we don't need all the republicans to go along. we need enough rational republicans and then the democrats can provide the rest of of the votes in we get a fair compromise. but anything less than fair that protects the middle class, the president has said he's not going to sign it. >> cynthia, the "new york times" reported on a conference call john boehner the speaker had and it's very interesting what tone he set and a gop senator. let me give you the quote p the quote from the "times" is that their party lost badly, mr. boehner said, they had to avoid the nasty showdowns that marked much of the last two years. members on the call subdued and dark, murmured words of support. that's interesting. and then you had senator bob corker, a key member of the banking committee, went
of the house, john boehner, by john mccain's own bff in the senate, joe lieberman, he also disagrees with mr. mccain on this. same goes for susan collins of maine who did go to the classified briefing yesterday and noted publicly that john mccain was not there. even though it was his committee. mccain's special investigation idea was also shot down today by republican senator richard burr who said, quote, i think you've got to allow the structure we have of oversight to function and i think the intelligence committee is more than capable of handling this. in other words, the senate is getting information so maybe we should, you know, get information instead of continuing to scream on tv about not getting information. here's how you know when somebody is being disingenuous. when they demand something and then you give them that thing that they just keep demanding about and they pretend that you're not giving it to them and they just keep making the demand anyway as if it hasn't been met. john mccain obviously sees some advantage somewhere in continuing to scream on tv about the fact he's not
of the united states. house speaker john boehner has less support each day for a hard line approach. republican opposition to tax increases is slipping in congress. anti-tax lobbyist grover norquist no longer as a majority of supporters in either chamber. "the hill" says newly elected republicans refuse to sign the anti-tax pledge during the campaigns and another handful of returning republicans have disavowed their alliance to the written commitment. it's about time. at least they paid attention to the election. today bobby jindal scolded the entire party for the approach to the economy. hold it right there. this comment, he sewer sounds like a democrat. we've got to make sure that weren't the party of big business, big banks, big wall street bailouts, big corporate loophole, big anything. we cannot be, we must not be the party that simply protects the rich so they get to keep their toys. bobby, come on over to the good side, dude. you're talking like a conservative democrat. momentum is on the president's side. he just needs to know how motivated his allies are. the hard work didn't end last
. >>> if the fiscal cliff negotiations seem familiar, we've seen the movie before. president obama and speaker boehner were unable to reach a debt deal in 2001. one of the by-products of the inaction was a downgrade of the country's credit rating. could this happen again? and what would it mean for the nation's financial standing across the globe? joining me is jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center for budget policies and priorities. good to see you again, when it comes to the credit rating, we've seen it happen before. all three credit rating agencies are saying you've got to put a deal together in washington, if you guys in washington don't get it done, we're going to downgrade your credit. >> we've seen this movie before. it's not a good movie. i will remind viewers that the last time standard and poors did take us down a notch, it actually didn't hurt our ability to finance our debt at all. so that was kind of blown off by the markets, but this time could be different. there's one interesting wrinkle here. i do believe that if the political discourse, which is actually sounding a little bet
party should take president obama up on his offer. you have speaker boehner saying, let's get compromise. this is the time to bring that debt down. we seriously have to do it. i don't think anyone disputes that, but it has to be a mix of spending cuts and the revenue. and the one figure that i'd like to add here is how much revenue we get by just going back to the clinton levels at $250,000 and above. that's $700 billion in tenures. that's what draws people to that number when you add that in and then close some loopholes and subsidies and do the budget cuts, we have already done a trillion. you can get to the $4 trillion that most economists say would at least lead us to the path to reduce debt over ten years. >> because it is so much money and because it would be so relatively painless for people who have income above $250,000 to see that change go back, because bill crystal is saying this now, because the president is clear that's what he's running on, it feels that's clear that's within the realm of the possible. but what else didn't previously peel like it was in the realm of possib
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8